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Archive for September, 2010

The Future of Java Rides on Guys Like These: Interview with Oracle’s Justin Kestelyn and Henrik Stahl

September 29th, 2010

Edit: The transcript can be found here

Justin KestelynHenrik Stahl

Once again we present another special Basement Coders podcast Live from Oracle's JavaOne conference in San Francisco.

We sit down with Oracle's Justin Kestelyn head of Oracle's OTN network and Henrik Stahl, product and strategy lead for Java Platform technologies to talk about the challenges they faced integrating the Oracle and Java communities and Oracle's commitment and goals for Java and the Open Source community

We think this makes for a nice contrast with our previous talk with James Gosling. If Justin, Henrik and Oracle can deliver on what is said in this cast, then Java is in good hands. It was great that both Henrik and Justin could take time out of their busy schedules, I mean quite literally JavaOne for them is an absolute roller coaster ride, so we appreciate very much the opportunity to talk with them.

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Note: As with our previous cast, this one was taped guerrila-style from the Mason St. Tent. For the most part it's ok, but from 11:36-15:18 minutes, you'll hear the Google lady get on her microphone to prod geeks into playing with Lego. Someone should have told her: you don't need a microphone to get geeks to play with Lego! Wait out the background noise and things go back to normal.

Before you accuse us of using "kid gloves" or skirting the real issues surrounding Oracle and Java it should be known that we had an Oracle PR chaperon overseeing the cast (you can see her in the pic below). It's why you won't hear the words "Google", "JCP" or "lawsuit" anywhere in this cast. That being said, we tried to get answers for the Open Source community as to the direction Oracle is taking things. I think Henrik and Justin did a great job, they seem very committed to Java's future.

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Transcript of our Interview with James Gosling

September 28th, 2010
The James Gosling Interview TranscriptThe James Gosling Interview was pretty tough to hear at points, what with all the background noise. Here is a transcript of the conversation so you can clear up some noisier parts of the cast. Special thanks to Kathleen Kriz and Cameron McKenzie for doing this!

Click the image on the left to view!

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Interview with James Gosling

September 22nd, 2010

Edit: The transcript can be found here

James GoslingPicture a Sunday Evening, you've just arrived from where ever you hail from to San Francisco. You got up at some ungodly hour to catch your flight, only to learn its been delayed 2 hours. Once you arrive catch the BART to your hotel, and come to realize "yeah, even two hours difference in timezone does add up". You have to put on your game-face though, there are Mai Tais to be drunk at the Tonga Room, and there are JavaOne "after parties" to hit.

The After Party circuit is a key sub-layer to the conference experience. Even if you aren't connected, you can still get into these "who's who" showcases as a lot of the partners open them up to anyone who registers on their respective websites.

For instance, our first after-party was the GlassFish party which took place at a favourite haunt of the Basement Coders called "The Thirsty Bear". The beer there is just spectacular. These after-parties are a great way to meet people you might never have talked to outside of a mailing list. Beer greases all social wheels.

James Gosling and The Basement CodersAbout a half hour into our libations in walks a legend: James Gosling, creator of Java itself. Nervously, but keeping our cool, we approached and introduced ourselves. We left it at that. As the beers flowed, our courage and machinations began too as well. "What if, now just what if, we could get Gosling to do a cast?" But doubting thoughts prevailed: "Nah we aren't big enough" "Do we really want to disturb a guy drinking his beer?" Quickly some of the Coder's wives keyed into our anxiety over the issue. Wanting to play match maker, they approached James and asked him if he'd be willing to do a podcast with us. And wouldn't you know it, he whipped out his iPhone (yay James!), opened his calendar and said "Sure! What works for you guys?" Speechless.

Have a good long listen to our coffee-shop interview with James Gosling. It's an unfiltered and organic talk with a legend of our craft. A Coder's Coder, and an all around great guy. If you like what you hear, why not buy one of his T-shirts and support the Free Java movement?

Listen here:

 

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Enjoy!

P.S.: We'll try to work on the quality of cast and filter out more of the background noise. The Server Side has offered to transcribe the cast, so stay tuned for a link to that. If you know any audio processing tricks, please let us know! We also have other related media which we'll post soon.

JRebelP.P.S. we also met a group of great guys from Zero Turn Around, they make this really interesting (and useful) product called JRebel which helps Java developers such that when you make changes to your code base, you no longer have to restart your application server to realize the changes. So no more restarting Tomcat or Jetty when you change your underlying source code! Very very cool stuff. Even better is they want to become a show sponsor, which is awesomer (probably not a word :D ).

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Episode 16 – Scala and Akka an Interview with Jonas Boner

September 13th, 2010
Jonas BonérIn this episode Justin and Craig have the privilege of speaking with Jonas Bonér about Scala and Akka. Jonas is a highly intelligent guy who's worked at Terracotta, BEA and was a founder of AspectWerkz.

We learn what Scala is and how the Akka framework helps developers write concurrent and fault tolerant systems. If you like what you hear from Jonas, be sure to follow him on Twitter @jboner

Links used during this podcast can be found in del.icio.us:

  • No bookmarks avaliable.

Listen here:

 

Download

Enjoy!

General, Podcast

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